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You may have heard of workplace wellness programs and all of the perks that companies offer their employees to help them stay healthy and present. But maybe, for one reason or another, you’ve never really explored what your company has. Even though employee health is good for your company, the focus is YOU so why not take advantage of it all? Here are three benefits you won’t want to miss out on.

Youthful energy: The carefree spirits and good health associated with young adults can be yours too when you take advantage of all the benefits your wellness program has to offer! These programs typically include benefits that are tailored towards helping you to greater physical health — whether that is giving you free fitness classes, getting you a standing desk, or encouraging noontime walks. Being more active through these activities reduces your risk of a whole sleuth of preventable diseases, like obesity and heart disease! These little fitness-y breaks also help you have higher energy levels, a better mood, and less muscle stress. Really, who can say they wouldn’t like to be more healthy?

Organized fun: That being said, sometimes becoming more healthy is hard. Whether it’s to lose that holiday weight or swim a mile, having others support you as you strive towards your goals increases your likelihood of achieving them. Your coworker might be trying to accomplish the same goal, so you can train together and share tips!

Employee health and wellness programs also help you have a greater sense of community at work through team-bonding (or competitive) activities. Think a friendly baseball game with your coworkers vs employees from a different department, a golf outing with the CEOs, or a whole-company charity walk. It’s always fun to make more friends at work, especially through interesting wellness activities.

Unused cash: Even if you’re generally healthy, it would be silly to not use resources already given to you at free or very discounted rates – and you definitely don’t want to spend money on something that you could get for free. My dad has worked at his company for around 10 years and just found out a year ago that he’s been getting a free gym membership with his employment this whole time 😛 .

Besides saving money through free fitness passes, you might be able to save cash in other ways. At some companies, joining a wellness program will make your health insurance premium less expensive or give you free health services. Ask your company to see what you get!

Employees nowadays often spend their 8-hour days sitting slumped at their desk staring at a computer screen, but you don’t have to be one of those people if you partake in some wellness on the job. A healthier you is a happier you and maybe a more productive, likely-to-be promoted you!

Pictures by Lyvly Ambassador: Highsam A. & Melissa

Lyvly Bee

You may have heard of workplace wellness programs and all of the perks that companies offer their employees to help them stay healthy and present. But maybe, for one reason or another, you’ve never really explored what your company has. Even though employee health is good for your company, the focus is YOU so why not take advantage of it all? Here are three benefits you won’t want to miss out on.

Youthful energyThe carefree spirits and good health associated with young adults can be yours too when you take advantage of all the benefits your wellness program has to offer! These programs typically include benefits that are tailored towards helping you to greater physical health — whether that is giving you free fitness classes, getting you a standing desk, or encouraging noontime walks. Being more active through these activities reduces your risk of a whole sleuth of preventable diseases, like…

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Prolonged sitting is linked to a long list of health issues, including lower-back pain and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Here are seven tips for increasing physical activity in the office.

Contact Energy in Motion to learn how workplace group fitness classes can save time and money. Learn why employees love the convenience of our onsite exercise programs and contact Tiffiny at Energy in Motion to learn how you can bring fitness classes to your workplace. #einmotion

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Your kids have their costumes ready and are counting down the days until October 31st! Maybe you’re having a party with school friends or plan to just walk the neighborhood. Whatever your plans, be sure to include some heart-healthy fun in the mix.

Try these tips to mapumpkin jack-o-lanternske your Halloween festivities a little healthier for your family, party guests and all those trick-or-treaters.

For the Trick-or-Treater

  • Fill up first. What kid doesn’t want to eat their favorite candy right when it goes into their trick-or-treat bag? Having a healthy meal BEFORE your kids go trick-or-treating can reduce their temptation to snack while walking or to overindulge, because their tummies will be full.
  • Bag it. Be sure to find the right size collection bag for your child and steer clear of the pillow case method. If you encourage your child to only take one piece of candy from each house, they’ll be able to visit more houses in the neighborhood.
  • Get rid of it! Worried you’ll have leftover Halloween candy until long after Valentine’s Day? Using a smaller bag will help, but sometimes kids STILL end up with a ton of extra sweets. Here are some ideas of what to do with the leftover candy:
    • Keep enough candy for one piece a day for one or two weeks (long enough for the excitement to wane). Throw away, donate or repurpose the rest.
    • When your child asks for a piece of candy, make sure to pair it with a healthy snack: an apple, a banana, some nuts, or celery with peanut butter.
    • “Buy back” candy from your child with money or tokens they can trade in for a fun activity: a day at the zoo, an afternoon playing at the park, going ice skating, or a day at the pool.
    • Some dentists’ offices have buy-back or trade-in programs, too.
    • Save it for holiday baking.
    • Donate excess candy to a homeless shelter or care package program for troops overseas. A familiar sweet treat from home can be comforting at the holidays.
    • Save it to fill the piñata at the next birthday celebration or give out with Valentine cards.
    • Use it in an arts and crafts project or to decorate a holiday gingerbread house.
    • Throw it away! And don’t be tempted by the half-priced candy after Halloween!
  • Get moving. Get some exercise by making this Halloween a fun family physical activity event. Set a goal of how many houses or streets you’ll visit, or compete to do as many as you can. Bring a bottle of water and wear comfortable shoes for walking!
  • Safety first. Check expiration dates and inspect all edibles before allowing children to eat them. Don’t let children eat anything with questionable or unknown ingredients, especially if they have food allergies.
  • Have a plan. Halloween can be a great time to talk with kids about making smart choices, the need for balance and moderation, and how to achieve an overall healthy eating pattern. Plan in advance how much candy they’ll be allowed to take at each house, keep and eat. If they’re old enough, let them help decide what to do with excess candy.

For the Party Host

  • Up the fright factor. Serve healthy snacks dressed up in the Halloween theme. There are lots of creative ideas being shared online at this time of year!
  • Play with food. Incorporate healthy foods into activities, such as decorating oranges like Jack-O-Lanterns, making banana ghosts, and bobbing for apples.
  • Keep ‘em moving. Include plenty of physical activities, like a zombie dance party, three-legged monster race, spider crawl or pumpkin toss.
  • Rethink your drink. Don’t forget that cutting back on sugary treats includes soda and sugar-sweetened beverages. Offer water, unsweetened tea, 100% juice, or fat-free/low-fat milk instead. Make a festive Halloween punch from sparkling water and a splash of 100% orange juice, garnished with plenty of orange slices and black grapes or blackberries.

For the Stay-At-Homer

Be THAT house. You don’t have to pass out candy on Halloween. Start a new tradition on your street and give out healthier treats or non-edible items. Get creative! Here are some ideas.

Healthier Treats:

  • Clementines or small oranges decorated like Jack-O-Lanterns (with non-toxic ink)
  • 100% juice boxes or pouches
  • Snack-sized packages of pretzels, popcorn, dried fruit, trail mix, nuts or pumpkin seeds
  • Snack-sized packages of fresh fruits and vegetables, such as baby carrots or apple slices
  • Mini boxes of raisins
  • 100% real fruit strips, ropes or leathers
  • Squeezable yogurt tubes or pouches
  • Sugar-free chewing gum

Non-edible items:

  • Glow sticks or small glow-in-the-dark toys
  • Crayons and coloring books
  • Stickers or stamps
  • Soap bubble makers
  • Plastic spider rings or vampire teeth

Be careful to avoid giving very small items that could be a choking hazard to little ones.

  • Who’s in charge? Hand out treats to each trick-or-treater – one per child – instead of letting them decide how much to take. If you have more than one item, ask them to choose which they prefer. This is a great way to get control of your Halloween budget, too!
  • Avoid the whole mess. Want to avoid candy and masses of kids at your door? Dress your family up in their costumes and go see a movie. Or deliver healthy Halloween treats to your local police and fire stations, nursing home or children’s hospital.

Source: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/How-to-Have-a-Heart-Healthy-Halloween_UCM_317432_Article.jsp#.WAuNTfkrKM8

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You’d like to mingle more with your co-workers, but every opportunity seems centered around eating and drinking. Don’t fret. There are plenty of ways to integrate your healthy lifestyle with your on-the-job social life, enabling you to boost your social capital while staying true to your health goals.

Studies show that healthy habits are strongly influenced by the people we spend time with, for better or for worse. Don’t let your co-workers’ negative health habits bring you down. Instead, be a positive role model for an active, healthy lifestyle and help build a corporate culture of health from the ground up.

Go For a Walk

  • Invite a co-worker to join you for a quick walk instead of a coffee or smoke break. You’ll have a chance to catch up on work or personal matters, and return to your work stations reenergized and focusing on the tasks at hand. Even a 15-minute walk can do wonders for your mood and creativity.
  • If you have a standing 1:1 meeting, suggest making it a walking meeting and reap the benefits of physical activity while getting the job done.
  • Take the stairs whenever possible and others will likely follow your example.
  • Take it one step further and organize a workplace walking group. Meet before or after work, during breaks or at lunch time for fun, fitness, and camaraderie.
  • Bring your lunches to a nearby park or other outdoor area. After eating, enjoy a walk together.
  • Visit a local bookstore, art gallery, or museum during your lunch break.

Team Training

  • Join a company-sponsored or community sports league and have fun playing basketball, softball, hockey or soccer with your work team.
  • Find a local fitness event, such as a 5K walk/run, walk-a-thon, or sprint triathlon and invite your colleagues to train together for the upcoming event.
  • If your workplace has an onsite gym or fitness classes, or if a nearby gym offers a corporate discount, participate.  It’s a great way to meet like-minded co-workers.
  • Help organize and promote an internal fitness event: Climb stairs to benefit a charity or create a pedometer step challenge.
  • Bicycle or walk to work. Find other employees who get to work on foot or on wheels and commute in together, if possible.
  • Take 2-minute stretch breaks throughout the day together.

Just For Fun

  • Organize a potluck, but bring a healthy dish to share and pay attention to your portion sizes.
  • Play Frisbee® or freeze tag on your lunch break.
  • Organize a weekend company day hike or volunteer to help organize active games at the employee picnic.
  • Volunteer as a work team to plant trees, clean up a park or walk dogs at the animal shelter.
  • If unwinding at a pub after work is part of your workplace culture, join in once in a while. Practice moderation, and if you don’t want to drink, order a sparkling water or orange juice.
  • Invite co-workers to your home for a barbeque and a backyard Badminton tournament.
  • Start an employee bowling league.
  • Invite a co-worker to join you for an after-work run, bicycle ride, or game of racquetball.

Social Success

Developing good relationships with the people you work with is important, not just for your career, but for your health. Don’t let your commitment to good health stop you from getting to know your co-workers. Take the initiative to be active at work and encourage others to join in. When you inspire your co-workers to make physical activity a priority, you create even more of the social support you need to keep yourself moving.

Original Article: https://www.acefitness.org/acefit/fitness-fact-article/3223/20-active-ways-to-be-social-at-work/

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The warmth of the summer months beckon us to spend time with family and friends outdoors and away from work to enjoy these precious days of sunshine. However, there are challenges to maintaining our mental well-being when these days come. I would like to share with you some facts about working in the summertime, and how you can help your staff feel their best.

Spreading the hours around

A study noted in the Huffington Post found that 26 per cent are not using paid vacation days provided by their employer. The majority of those said it was because they felt they had too much work to do and taking time away would leave them behind in their work. Others are saving their vacation days for emergencies, and still others claimed to not want a vacation. By encouraging staff to take time away, even for a staycation, the benefits in creativity can be reaped when returning with a fresh view and feeling more relaxed. Time away also decreases burnout and subsequently can reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Covering for others

According to CMHA Ontario, the summer months of vacation time can be a cause of stress for those filling in for others in their absence. Whether it is on the assembly line or in an office, taking on the job of another, often one that they may have little experience doing, can make those employees feel anxious and stressed. When personal life stressors occur during this time, the pressure at work can seem overwhelming. To make vacations work for everyone, discuss with everyone the upcoming workload so you can plan deadlines around vacation dates. Knowing who is on vacation and when will also help you plan your projects. Ensure staff that is covering for others are clearly aware of new tasks and responsibilities, and check in to see how manageable the workload is while other staff is away.

Seasonal Depression

Seasonal Affective Disorder typically affects some in the winter months with shorter and colder days, but there are some individuals who are affected by depression in the summertime. Increased humidity is unbearable for some, who may stay in their air-conditioned home to avoid the heat, and are likely less active as a result. When it’s too hot to cook, many choose to eat out or order in and poor food choices are often made. Changes in routine and schedules can bring on feelings of depression, such as having bored school children or university students now at home. Financial strain with camp and entertainment costs is increased, as well as the costs of going on a destination vacation. Wearing shorts or bathing suits can increase feelings of poor body image, and may inhibit some from joining friends at the beach or poolside. Some signs of summer depression to look for in your staff could include difficulty sleeping, loss of appetite, weight loss or gain, and feelings of anxiety. One way to stave off symptoms of depression is to maintain physical fitness, so encourage employees to use their employee discount at the air-conditioned gym, even for the summer months. Another way to maintain mental wellness is to stay connected, so hosting a BBQ for staff to enjoy each other’s company outside of the workplace and engage with each other in a social environment helps build camaraderie, minimize isolation and enhance work relationships.

I hope you take the time to enjoy your summer, with your co-workers, family and friends!

via Keeping Your Cool in the Workplace this Summer — Charles Benayon

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Employers finding wellness programs can be good for a company’s culture — and bottom line

 

By Daria Meoli, January 4, 2016 at 11:45 AM
(PHOTO BY AARON HOUSTON)

When Tiffiny Marinelli founded Energy in Motion, a Rockaway-based business specializing in group exercise instruction and corporate wellness seminars, nearly 20 years ago, she never could have predicted how the demand for her services would change. When she started creating wellness programs in the 1990s, Marinelli worked with big, corporate clients such as AT&T, Lucent and Home Depot to develop wellness perk programs to sweeten the compensation package for employees.

Today, she focuses on the smaller businesses that look to wellness as A way to put a lid on health care costs. “There are many smaller companies with less resources and less ability to drive a culture of wellness within their company,” Marinelli said. The market for corporate wellness products and services has exploded. And with products even Marinelli couldn’t have predicted.

Take The Fruit Guys, a national organic fresh fruit delivery service that started in San Francisco but is expanding rapidly on the East Coast. Drew Dix has been the director of sales development since 2010. According to Dix, who works out of the company’s Maplewood office, The Fruit Guys delivers fresh fruit to more than 4,000 businesses around the country. Dix has had a front-row seat to the emerging wellness trend. “The biggest change we’ve seen is that companies are adopting a new position called a wellness director or a wellness manager, and that did not exist 20 years ago,” he said. “It’s always been in the realm of HR to dictate employee benefits. But the concept of wellness has evolved from a flu shot and an HSA to weight loss, nutrition and fitness programs. That role is still part of HR, but we’ve seen a lot of companies make that a full-time job.”

Companies of all sizes and industries across the state are getting serious about their employee wellness and health improvement programs for many reasons. Healthier employees mean lower insurance rates for employers. More and more companies are designing and implementing health improvement strategies to mitigate the costs of unhealthy employees and avoid the types of high claims that lead to rate hikes. “Health care rates are getting higher and will probably continue to rise,” Marinelli said. “People already are struggling to afford the rates. If you can get employees healthy and you can help them manage their chronic conditions, you will see a huge change in the overall cost of health care benefits.”

In 2014, the Affordable Care Act made wellness a priority for health insurance providers by creating a set of rules mandating providers incentivize corporate wellness programs and reward individuals for engaging in healthy behaviors. Brian Marshall, manager of wellness at the Cranbury-based AmeriHealth, sees the change every day. “The ACA forces us to be creative and inclusive to make sure our wellness incentives are targeting everyone,” he said. “Instead of treating the disease, we want to treat the person. Since the ACA was enacted, there are no costs associated to wellness screenings such as mammograms, colonoscopy and immunizations, and that has opened up preventative care to people who may not have realized it was available before.” AmeriHealth, for example, rewards fitness milestones and healthy behavior by reimbursing individuals for participating in fitness programs, stress management activities, flu shots, dentist visits and parenting classes.

“It’s all self-reported through our online portal, which gets people engaged with managing their own care,” Marshall said. Marshall said he foresees two corporate wellness trends gaining momentum in 2016 .“One trend we are seeing is employer groups are becoming much more active in designing their own programs,” he said. “At one time, corporate clients looked to us as subject matter experts. Now, they look to us as partners in the process and they come to the table with more of an understanding of what most effective strategies for their group would be.”

Marshall also predicts companies will offer more incentives to employees for participating in the wellness programs. These incentives are not just in the form of reduced premiums being passed on to employees, but they will offer time off, better working environments and other perks in exchange for participation. Marinelli has seen the carrot-and-stick approach work for many companies. “Depending on how much money a company has, a wellness program should be incentivized, even if it’s a small amount,” she said.

By way of example, Marinelli said employees might be hesitant about biometric screenings because of privacy concerns. A company should incentivize that initial screening with raffles or gift cards for people who attend. Through the program, the company educates employees on the personal benefits of doing the screening, such as saving a trip to the primary care doctor and getting immediate results. Over time, the company has another screening and promotes it by reminding employees about the positive experience they had at the last screening. But this time, instead of a gift card, you offer to lower their premiums. “It’s a much more effective process than telling employees, ‘If you don’t get this screening, you’ll have to pay more for your premium,’” Marinelli said.

In addition to lowering health care costs, companies continue to leverage wellness as a retention perk. “If you invest in your employees, you get that tangible return as well as less sick days, better morale, (and) higher retention rate,” Dix said. “If you walk into a startup and see pingpong tables and video games, what you are really looking at is a company competing for top talent. Fresh fruit and other wellness perks are also part of an effective retention package.” Marinelli said not all companies are ready to take this approach to wellness. “But, companies that are innovative and can look ahead to see where things are going with regard to health care and they want their companies to survive, they are going to get more serious about wellness,” she said.

Starting an effective wellness program

When a company first launches a wellness program, it’s best to start by dipping a toe in the pool rather than throwing employees into the deep end.
John Gallucci, founder and president of JAG Physical Therapy, an orthopedic physical therapy provider with multiple locations throughout New Jersey, has worked with many corporate clients as part of their employee wellness programs. Gallucchi believes the best way to get started is with educational programs. He says he has led many successful “lunch and learn” sessions on a range of topics, including the health risks of siting all day and how to mitigate them, how to fight dehydration, proper ergonomics and avoiding sports-related injuries. “There are a lot of weekend warriors out there who don’t engage in physical activity all week then go out and play a few pickup games one night and get hurt,” Gallucchi said. “Sports-related injuries contribute to absenteeism and poor productivity.”

Tiffiny Marinelli, founder of Rockaway-based Energy in Motion, suggests kicking off any corporate wellness program with an activity employees will actually look forward to. “If a client is just getting started and they really don’t have a company culture of wellness, the first thing I do is introduce something that is really fun for employees and build on that positive experience,” Marinelli said. “An example could be a stress management program where we bring in a massage therapist, yoga teacher or meditation expert. Other fun ways to get started include a session on how to de-stress at your desk, cooking demonstrations or walking programs.”

Employee wellness is a business strategy and should be treated like one. Marinelli recommends companies establish a mission statement or a business plan for improving the health of their employees. By documenting a plan, businesses can allocate budgets and measure effectiveness of the various aspects of the wellness program.

Marinelli has been in the corporate wellness industry for more than 20 years and said that for a health improvement program to be effective and actually save a money for a company, wellness has to be part of the company culture. “An emphasis on wellness has to come from the top down and executive management has to play a role,” she said. “It’s important that organizational policies promote wellness by encourage healthy choices and educating the employees on health improvement.”

E-mail to: dariam@njbiz.comOn Twitter: @dariameoli

Source: http://www.njbiz.com/article/20160104/NJBIZ01/301049998/resolution-2016-change-of-heart

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Get Out of Your Slump: Good Posture Tips to Relieve Pain and StressDo you have a demanding boss or difficult co-workers? Stacks of work to get done and not enough time? Everyone encounters job stress sooner or later — but that doesn’t make it easier. There are many aspects of your work environment that you have no control over — but you can take action to manage stress so that work doesn’t take a toll on your well-being.

Stress Matters

Workplace stress has been linked to serious health problems — including heart attack. Your body releases greater amounts of the hormone cortisol in response to stress — stimulating an increased appetite for high-fat, high-sugar foods, and increasing fat storage in the abdomen. A study of workers coping with corporate restructuring and layoffs revealed that chronic job stress led to weight gain. Not surprisingly, consumption of high-fat, high-calorie vending machine snacks went way up during the most stressful periods. Research also shows that intense job stress is an independent risk factor for high blood pressure at work, home, and even while sleeping.

Work Mindfully

Mindfulness is a way of zeroing in on the here and now instead of ruminating over the past, mulling over the future, or doing several things at once. Give your full attention to the task at hand, whether it’s a call, a meeting, or a project. Scrolling through your messages while on a phone conference may feel productive — but in the long run, multitasking will only add to your stress and drain your energy.

Be Nice

Get to know your co-workers by asking about their weekends, inviting their opinions, and eating lunch together. Collegial co-worker relationships make the workplace more pleasant for everyone —and studies even show that a positive outlook is contagious. Offer genuine compliments. Smile frequently — it’ll boost your mood and encourage those around you to lighten up.

Communicate Well

Miscommunication is the root of many workplace conflicts. Clarify details and expectations for every job task. Check for understanding if you’re the one dishing out assignments.

Annoying co-workers are best dealt with immediately and directly — or the behavior may get worse. If your co-worker distracts you with loud, lengthy personal calls, talk with her privately instead of just getting frustrated. If it continues, speak with your manager.

Shake It Off

You can let yourself get wound up and upset about things that happen at work — or you can respond differently. Instead of stewing about a project that was dumped on you, could you view it as an opportunity to showcase your skills, talent, and teamwork — or speak with your supervisor? Instead of letting one grumpy customer get you down, can you focus on the 50 grateful customers you helped today? Take a few full, deep breaths to clear your mind and proceed down a more positive path.

Practice Smart Self-Care

Regular exercise and good nutrition — along with time for fun and relaxation —boosts your ability to cope with stress. And when you’re well-rested, stressors are more manageable. Consider taking a walk at break time, or meeting a friend for lunch. Learn relaxation breathing and stretching exercises to do at your desk. Choose high-energy, nutritious foods for meals and snacks. Cultivate a healthy sense of humor; look for the laughable moments in everyday life at work.

Get Help

If your best efforts don’t reduce your stress and talking with your manager doesn’t help, seek advice from your human resources department or employee relations representative. Some employers offer employee assistance programs (EAP) that provide confidential, 24/7 phone consultation with professional counselors for personal matters and workplace issues. If your employer offers this benefit, don’t hesitate to use it.

Make a Change

Life is too short to spend it in a toxic workplace — and living with chronic stress isn’t a long-term solution. No job is stress-free, but if your current job isn’t a good match for your interests, talents, and goals, create a plan to move on. Paint a realistic picture of your dream job by talking with others in your desired line of work before you make the leap.

Additional Resources
The American Institute of Stress

UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

References:

Clays, Els Leynen, Francoise De Bacquer, Dirk Kornitzer, Marcel Kittel, France Karasek, Robert PhD; De Backer, Guy, High job strain and ambulatory blood pressure in middle-aged men and women from the Belgian job stress study, JOEM April 2007, Vol. 49, Issue 4, pp.360-367. Abstract.http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2007/04000/High_Job_Strain_and_Ambulatory_Blood_Pressure_in.5.aspx

Fowler J, Christaki, J, Dynamic spread of happiness in al arge social network, BMJ 2008; 337(2338), posted 12/16/2008, retrieved May 18, 2008 from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/584834

Maglione-Garves, C, Kravitz, L, Schneider, S, Cortisol connection: tips on managing stress and weight, retrieved May 18, 2010 from: http://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/stresscortisol.html

Nauert, R, Workplace stress linked to obesity, retrieved on May 18, 2010 from: http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/03/25/workplace-stress-linked-to-obesity/12382.html

Fernandez, I, Su, H, Winter, P, Liang, H, Association of workplace chronic and acute stressors with employee weight status: data from worksites in turmoil, JOEM, Jan 2010, v.52, Issue 1S, pp. S34-S41.Abstract. http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2010/01001/Association_of_Workplace_Chronic_and_Acute.7.aspx

Article: https://www.acefitness.org/acefit/healthy_living_fit_facts_content.aspx?itemid=3053

Copyright© 2015 The American Council on Exercise.

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