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Archive for the ‘aerobic’ Category

16851992Walking is low-risk and easy to start. It can help keep you fit and reduce your risk of serious diseases, like heart disease, stroke, diabetes and more.

A regular walking program can also:

American Heart Association recommends that adults get 150 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week. Even short 10 minute activity sessions can be added up over the week to reach this goal. If you would benefit from lowering your blood pressure or cholesterol, aim for 40 minute sessions of moderate to vigorous activity 3 to 4 times a week. You could do this by walking 2 miles briskly (about 4 miles/hr). If that’s too fast, choose a more comfortable pace.

Get ready

All you need to get started are comfortable clothes and supportive shoes. Layer loose clothing, keeping in mind that brisk exercise elevates the body’s temperature. Shoes designed for walking or running are best. Make sure you have a little wiggle room between your longest toe (1/2″) and the end of the shoe. Avoid cotton socks since they retain moisture and can promote blisters.

Work on your technique

  • Begin with short distances. Start with a stroll that feels comfortable (perhaps 5-10 minutes) and gradually increase your time or distance each week by 10-20 percent by adding a few minutes or blocks. If it’s easier on your joints and your schedule to take a couple of 10- to 20-minute walks instead of one long walk, do it!
  • Focus on posture. Keep your head lifted, tummy pulled in and shoulders relaxed. Swing your arms naturally. Avoid carrying hand weights since they put extra stress on your elbows and shoulders. Don’t overstride. Select a comfortable, natural step length. If you want to move faster, pull your back leg through more quickly.
  • Breathe deeply. If you can’t talk or catch your breath while walking, slow down. At first, forget about walking speed. Just get out there and walk!

Pick up the pace

To warm up, walk at an easy tempo for the first several minutes. Then gradually adopt a more purposeful pace. A good way to add variety is to incorporate some brisk intervals. For example, walk one block fast, two blocks slow and repeat several times. Gradually add more fast intervals with shorter recovery periods. Concentrate on increasing your speed while maintaining good posture.

Walking hills is a great way to tone your legs. Using Nordic walking poles can help your burn more calories and give you better posture and overall muscle endurance. Treadmill walking, while not as scenic, can be convenient during bad weather.

The end of your walk is an ideal time to stretch since your body is warmed up. Stretch your hamstrings and calves as well as your chest, shoulders and back. Hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.

Track your progress. Although experts recommend walking at least 30 minutes a day, there are no hard and fast rules. Walking 60 minutes/day and brisk intervals will help you burn more calories. Fit walking into your schedule whenever you can. That may mean three 10-minute walks over the course of a day. The best schedule is one that keeps you walking and keeps you fit!

Be safe

  • Avoid traffic accidents. Listening to lively music while you walk is a great way to energize your workout. But if you wear headphones, keep the volume down and watch out for traffic that you may not hear. Wear light colors or reflective clothing and carry a flashlight or glow stick if you walk when visibility is low.
  • Walking on sidewalks is best, but if you have to walk on the street, stick to streets with lower speed limits. Faster streets are riskier because motorists are less likely to see pedestrians and cannot stop as quickly. Accidents involving pedestrians have an 85 percent chance of becoming fatal if the car is moving at 40 mph as compared to only 5 percent if the speed is 20 mph.
  • Know your area. Pay attention to what businesses are open in the area you’ll be walking and know the location of emergency telephones. Walk on well-traveled streets rather than taking shortcuts in less crowded areas such as alleys or parking lots. If you give the message that you are calm, self-assured and have a purposeful gait, you’ll lower your chances of becoming a victim.
  • Two heads are better than one. Walking with a partner or in groups discourages crime and may help alert you to dangers such as speeding motorists or unleashed dogs.

If you experience foot, knee, hip or back pain when walking, STOP and check with your doctor to find out the cause. You may need special exercises or better shoes. If you have osteoarthritis and experience increased joint pain lasting an hour or two after walking, consider an alternate activity like stationery cycling or water exercise. But don’t stop exercising!

Source: Walking 101

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8295214_XXLMorning, midday or midnight — when’s the best time to work out?

Well, that depends on when’s the best time for you.

“The best time of the day is when you will do it most consistently, because the benefits of physical activity are tightly linked to the amount you do on a consistent basis,” said Russell Pate, Ph.D., professor of exercise science in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

Your best time is based on a “constellation” of factors:

  • location,
  • time of day,
  • type of physical activity and
  • social setting, among others.

“It’s not just what time, but what activity, with whom and where,” said Pate, who is also an American Heart Association volunteer. “This mix of factors for people come together to result in being consistent.”

Everybody’s Different

“Different people will have different preferences and predispositions with regard to how they respond to exercise at different times of the day,” Pate said.

For example, if you’re much more likely to work out consistently with a partner, “then you’re better off to opt for a social part regardless of the time of day,” Pate said. “On the other hand, some people like the solitude, the chance to get away.”

You might have heard that the best time to work out is early in the morning — to get your metabolism revving or to avoid unexpected distractions during the day that could derail your regimen. “Are there differences in working out at different times of the day? Maybe. But those differences would be minor compared to the overall effect of doing it consistently,” Pate said.

“If you’re not a morning person, it does no good for you to try to get up at 5 in the morning to work out,” he said. “Try to stack as many cards on your side of the table as possible by doing what’s most likely to work for you. The converse is, don’t make it as hard as it doesn’t have to be.”

Fit in Fitness

The American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. But what if you’re tight on time? Then, be creative and break up your activity into daily bouts of 3-10-minute increments.

For example:

  • In the morning, park 10 minutes away from the job and walk briskly.
  • At lunch, walk 10 minutes in or around where you work.
  • In the afternoon/evening, walk briskly 10 minutes back to your vehicle.

And there you have a 30-minute workout!

“Accumulation across the day doesn’t have to be performed in one bout, but can be across the day,” Pate said. “More is better, but we’re absolutely certain even modest amounts are much better than being sedentary.” And remember, “exercise” is any kind of physical activity that gets your heart rate up for at least 10 minutes at a time.

So get moving — at the time that’s right for you!

Source: When is the best time of day to work out?

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Ready to get up and running? Congratulations! This simple yet powerful act will take your mind, body, and spirit to a better place. And the greatest thing about running is anyone can do it. You don’t need fancy equipment or an Olympian’s physique. If you were ever a toddler, you already know the basics.

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6 Tips for Creating and Sticking to an Exercise ScheduleUsing a heart rate monitor can help get the most out of your workouts and the instant data feedback is a great motivational tool. All heart rate monitors work by measuring electrical signals from the heart and displaying them on the unit’s data center. Chest strap models, which strap to the chest and display data through a wristwatch attachment, are the most accurate. Their proximity to the heart allows for a better reading, and you don’t have to stop moving to check your reading. This data is intended to help ensure your training regimen is not too easy or too intense, but just right for maximum effectiveness.

1) Calculate MHR
MHR= 220-age

Example for a 33 year old
220-33=187 (MHR)

2) Calculate minimum THR
Lower limit = MHR X .60

Example
187 X .60=112 (lower limit)

3) Calculate maximum THR
Upper limit = MHR X .85

Example
187 X .85=159 (upper limit)

The first thing to consider when buying a heart rate monitor is what information you need during your workout. Basic models feature alarms notifying you when you’re out of the desired THR range and is all most people need. Many other features are available such as a stop watch, interval timers, wireless data transfer, training tests, and calorie counter – but they add to the cost. If you know you won’t take full advantage of these features, you can save a good amount of money by choosing a basic unit.

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ZUMBA! Ditch the workout, join the party! Shed pounds and have fun doing it. Classes held at the Ukrainian American Cultural Center of New Jersey in Whippany. New session starts September 10th. Join any time. Open to all levels. Contact Energy in Motion LLC at info@einmotion.com with any questions. You can also find us on Facebook.

Zumba Classes in Whippany NJ

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The question “What should I do first, cardio or weights?” is the question most asked by my clients. The answer? It depends.

Some trainers will tell you that weight training before cardio will deplete the muscles’ stored carbohydrates (glycogen or sugar), and therefore, will enhance fat burning during the cardio workout due to the lack of available sugar for fuel. In reality, whether you perform cardio before or after weight training will not affect how many calories you burn. There is no magical exercise order and whether you do cardio or weight training first should depend on your fitness goals and priorities. What’s more important to you? Being able to run a 5K? Loosing weight? Gaining muscle? Preventing health related diseases such as diabetes or heart disease? Your goals should dictate how you structure your workouts.

Increasing Muscle Size and Strength

If your goal for the day is focusing on gaining muscle mass, I suggest weight training first. Weight training requires a lot of energy and power. Cardio first depletes the body of the energy it needs leaving you fatigued and unable to train as intensely with weights. Cardio first also induces fatigue that may compromise technique and possibly increase risk of injury.

Increasing Cardiovascular Endurance and Reducing Body Fat

If your goal is to lose body fat or run a 5K, cardio first is the best option. Over time cardio exercise depletes the body’s supply of glycogen – a primary source of stored energy. Once glycogen is depleted, the body turns to more long-term storage sources, like fat. However, that doesn’t mean weight training is not important for fat loss. Because dieting and cardiovascular exercise alone results in lean tissue losses, weight training is essential to help prevent that loss. People often focus on their caloric expenditure during the workout itself. While this is important, the primary focus should be on the caloric expenditure over time. Because muscle mass is metabolically active tissue, the more you have, the more calories you burn throughout the day.

Improving Overall Health

If your goal is overall health, it really doesn’t matter if you lift weights first or do endurance training first. In fact, one of my favorite exercise protocols is interval training or circuit training routines that alternate between weight lifting and cardiovascular exercise. It’s fun, challenging, and you are always “surprising” the muscles with something different.

The Bottom Line

When evaluating exercise order, consider whether that approach fits your unique circumstances and goals. To get the most out of your workout, perform the exercise most important to your goals first when you are not fatigued. The order of whether cardio should be done first, second, or integrated in your workout really depends on you. In the end, success with your exercise program depends on how consistent and productive you are. Since time is the number one reason people don’t exercise, it’s more important to do what you enjoy to stay consistent then following the science.

Tiffiny Twardowsky, Energy in Motion LLC copyright 2012

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You’d think a simple activity like walking would be just that, simple. But fewer than 50% of American adults do enough exercise to gain any health or fitness benefits from physical activity. Is walking our salvation? I don’t know for sure, but evidence suggests that it’s probably a good start.

What Are the Top 10 Reasons to Walk?

  1. Walking prevents type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program showed that walking 150 minutes per week and losing just 7% of your body weight (12-15 pounds) can reduce your risk of diabetes by 58%.
  2. Walking strengthens your heart if you’re male. In one study, mortality rates among retired men who walked less than one mile per day were nearly twice that among those who walked more than two miles per day.
  3. Walking strengthens your heart if you’re female. Women in the Nurse’s Health Study (72,488 female nurses) who walked three hours or more per week reduced their risk of a heart attack or other coronary event by 35% compared with women who did not walk.
  4. Walking is good for your brain. In a study on walking and cognitive function, researchers found that women who walked the equivalent of an easy pace at least 1.5 hours per week had significantly better cognitive function and less cognitive decline than women who walked less than 40 minutes per week. Think about that!
  5. Walking is good for your bones. Research shows that postmenopausal women who walk approximately one mile each day have higher whole-body bone density than women who walk shorter distances, and walking is also effective in slowing the rate of bone loss from the legs.
  6. Walking helps alleviate symptoms of depression. Walking for 30 minutes, three to five times per week for 12 weeks reduced symptoms of depression as measured with a standard depression questionnaire by 47%.
  7. Walking reduces the risk of breast and colon cancer. Women who performed the equivalent of one hour and 15 minutes to two and a half hours per week of brisk walking had an 18% decreased risk of breast cancer compared with inactive women. Many studies have shown that exercise can prevent colon cancer, and even if an individual person develops colon cancer, the benefits of exercise appear to continue both by increasing quality of life and reducing mortality.
  8. Walking improves fitness. Walking just three times a week for 30 minutes can significantly increase cardiorespiratory fitness.
  9. Walking in short bouts improves fitness, too! A study of sedentary women showed that short bouts of brisk walking (three 10-minute walks per day) resulted in similar improvements in fitness and were at least as effective in decreasing body fatness as long bouts (one 30-minute walk per day).
  10. Walking improves physical function. Research shows that walking improves fitness and physical function and prevents physical disability in older persons.

The list goes on, but if I continued, there’d be no time for you to start walking! Suffice to say that walking is certainly good for you!

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