Posts Tagged ‘metabolism’

16851992Walking is the most popular form of exercise and offers great health benefits, even if it doesn’t burn as many calories as running or other more intense forms of exercise. But a new study has some encouraging news: The equations commonly used to predict the number of calories burned during walking count too few calories in nearly all cases on level surfaces.

Here’s why: Standardized equations commonly used to predict or estimate walking energy expenditure assume that one size fits all. Plus, the equations, which have been in place for close to half a century, were based on data from a limited number of people.

A new study at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that under firm, level ground conditions, the most commonly used standards are relatively inaccurate and have significant bias. The standards predicted too few calories burned in 97 percent of the cases researchers examined, said SMU physiologist Dr. Lindsay Ludlow.

A new standardized equation developed by SMU scientists, however, is about four times more accurate for adults and kids together, and about two to three times more accurate for adults only, Ludlow said.

“Our new equation is formulated to apply regardless of the height, weight and speed of the walker,” said Ludlow, a researcher in the SMU Locomotor Performance Laboratory of biomechanics expert Dr. Peter Weyand. “And it’s appreciably more accurate.” Study results, along with the new equation, were published earlier this year in The Journal of Applied Physiology.

“The economy of level walking is a lot like shipping packages,” explains Weyand. “There is an economy of scale. Big people get better gas mileage when fuel economy is expressed on a per-pound basis.”

The SMU equation predicts the calories burned as a person walks on a firm, level surface. Ongoing research is expanding the algorithm to predict the calories burned while walking up- and downhill, and while carrying loads, Ludlow says.

The research comes at a time when greater accuracy combined with mobile technology, such as wearable sensors like Fitbit, is increasingly being used in real time to monitor the body’s status. The researchers note that some devices use the old standardized equations, while others use a different method to estimate the calories burned.


To provide a comprehensive test of the leading standards, SMU researchers compiled a database using the extensive walking metabolism data available in the existing scientific literature to evaluate the leading equations for walking on level ground.

“The SMU approach improves upon the existing standards by including different-sized individuals and drawing on a larger database for equation formulation,” Weyand explains.

The new equation achieves greater accuracy by better incorporating the influence of body size, and by specifically incorporating the influence of height on gait mechanics. Specifically:

  • Bigger people burn fewer calories on a per-pound basis of their body weight to walk at a given speed or to cover a fixed distance.
  • The older standardized equations don’t account for size differences; rather, they assume that roughly one size fits all.

The exact dates are a bit murky, but the leading standardized equations, known by their shorthand as the “ACSM” and “Pandolf” equations, were developed about 40 years ago for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and for the military, respectively, Ludlow says.

The Pandolf method, for example, draws on walking metabolism data from six U.S. soldiers, she said. Both the Pandolf and ACSM equations were developed on a small number of adult males of average height.

The new, more accurate equation will prove useful, as predicting energy expenditure is common in many fields, including those focused on health, weight loss, exercise, military and defense, and professional and amateur physical training. Accurate estimations of the rate at which calories are burned could potentially help predict a person’s aerobic power and likelihood for executing a task, such as training for an athletic competition or carrying out a military objective.

In general, the new metabolic estimates can be combined with other physiological signals such as body heat, core temperature and heart rate to improve predictions of fatigue, overheating, dehydration, the aerobic power available and whether a person can sustain a given intensity of exercise.

  • SMU’s new and improved equation for predicting the energy expenditure of walking:
  • VO2total = VO2rest + 3.85 + 5.97·V2/Ht (where V is measured in m/s, Ht in meters, and VO2 in ml O2·kg−1·min−1)

Source: ACE – ProSource: May 2016 – Study: Walkers Burn More Calories Than Previously Thought


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There are a lot of viable ways to get fit or maintain that optimal physique, but did you know that coconut oil could one of the best things you could use?  That’s right: the saturated fats that are found in high-quality coconut oil may actually increase your general health over time.  In a world where the average consumer is inundated with weight loss and health improvement options, it may come as a relief to some folks to hear that something as natural as coconut oil could make all the difference.  While certain folks hear the word “coconut” and picture sunny beaches and tropical drinks, others are hearing the same term and instead becoming reminded of its incredible health-related properties.

The Truth of the Matter

You may have heard some bad things about coconut oil, but your source was mistaken.  If coconut oil were so bad for your health, then those cultures who have been using it would have some serious health problems.  The truth of the matter is: those who use coconut oil regularly are often healthier than those who do not.  Although the benefits may not be obvious to some folks, it is important to understand the value of a good source of saturated fats.

Coconut oil is typically classified as a “medium chain triglyceride” (MCT) which means that the fats within it are passed through your body relatively quickly.  In addition, these particular types of fats rush to the liver which turn the MCTs into a quick burst of energy for you as well.  At the end of the day this benefit could translate into a better working metabolism and ultimately a stronger body.

Other Benefits

Did you know that there are a lot more benefits to using coconut oil besides for simply improving your metabolism?  In reality, coconut oil contains robust amounts of omega-3 fatty acids as well. On top of that, coconut oil is great for cooking because it does not go through oxidation as quickly as other cooking oils.  The slow oxidation makes coconut oil essential to removing harmful free-radicals and other toxins from the body.  These combined properties make coconut oil a wonderful addition to any recipe and are vital to healthy weight loss and fitness management.

Can Coconut Oil help with Diabetes?

Okay, so coconut oil is great for weight loss and fitness, but it is any good for those people who deal with type 2 diabetes?  The answer is a resounding “yes.”  Because coconut oil is turned into energy so quickly, it has the ability to help people manage their blood sugar levels more efficiently.  Over time, users of coconut oil could actually see their insulin sensitivity reduced to surprising levels.

What else should I know?

In our attempt to become optimally fit and healthy we often turn to some pretty desperate measures – ones which ultimately leave our bodies feeling the brunt of those bad decisions.  Thankfully, there are remedies such as coconut oil to come to the rescue.  Using a high-quality coconut oil in your recipes can help soothe any indigestion, all while lessening those cravings for sweets you may sometimes get.

Contrary to popular belief, coconut oil is a spectacular ingredient that you would be wise to incorporate into your everyday diet.  Losing weight is one thing, but being able to improve your overall health in a simple way is essential to your longevity.  Be sure coconut oil is right for you by speaking with your doctor or a nutritionist for more information.

© 2014 Tiffiny Marinelli, Energy in Motion

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How much do you really know about the calorie? Do you know how to determine your daily calorie intake? How many calories are in a gram of fat? Too many questions?! Have no fear, and check out this infographic. Behold, The Complete Guide to Calories.


<a href=”http://tiny99.com/887696“>Source</a>

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